Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141 Page 142 Page 143 Page 144 Page 145 Page 146 Page 147 Page 148 CHESTERCOUNTY-LIFE.COM / November/December 2016 103 care community is alive with natural beauty. Birds sing, butterflies soar, deer dart about, and an occasional fox frolics, much to the delight of residents. The refuge will preserve and expand native species and improve the quality of wildlife on the grounds. As Dunwoody’s excellent lifestyle and health care options grew in recognition, more space was developed for homes and apartments. The Residents Association and administration, though proud of the com- munity’s outstanding appeal, realized pro- tecting its remaining acreage for fauna living outside their doors was critical. Dr. Stuckert is joined by 11 other residents who are plan- ning and driving an eight-zone four-year project. “We are fortunate to have several accom- plished residents as well as Dunwoody staff support,” says Dr. Stuckert. “Two commit- tee members are employees of the Natural Lands Trust, and another is a semi-retired LEED-certified landscape architect. The head groundskeeper was trained at Long- wood Gardens. It all began when Residents Association President Pat McCarter wanted to found a bird sanctuary, and Dunwoody’s CEO took her idea further, suggesting a wildlife preserve. I was invited to help be- cause of strong management experience in somewhat related areas. The project is ex- With a broad range of services and a team of professionals who are committed to keeping people of all ages safe at home, BAYADA provides: • Nursing, rehabilitation, and assistive care • Thoroughly screened health care professionals • Clinical support 24 hours, 7 days • A variety of payment options Nursing 610-353-5000 Assistive care 610-891-9400 The Best Care Comes in the Comfort of Home www.bayada.com Connie Stuckert, Leila Peck, and Eloise Smyrl taking pleasure in maintaining an encroaching forest of bamboo!