Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141 Page 142 Page 143 Page 144 Page 145 Page 146 Page 147 Page 148 CHESTERCOUNTY-LIFE.COM / November/December 2016 111 CCTA are those with risk factors for coro- nary artery disease, such as high blood pres- sure or elevated serum cholesterol. Diabetes, a family history of heart disease, smoking, obesity, and sedentary lifestyle are other risks. Computed tomography colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses CT imaging to examine the large intes- tine for polyps. CT images are reconstructed using 3D computer processing software to create a highly accurate pictorial represen- tation of the wall of the colon, very similar to what an endoscopist would see during an actual colonoscopy. Some patients at Brinton Lake Imag- ing inquire about the difference between an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and a PET (positron emission tomography) scan. An MRI uses a variable magnetic field and radio waves to produce images and discrimi- nate between unhealthy and healthy tissue. Contrast may be injected via a vein to en- hance imaging in certain situations. In con- trast, a PET scan relies on the injection of a radiotracer, a chemical that is tagged or con- nected with a very low dose of a radioactive substance. It gauges function within tissue by producing images that gauge metabolic func- tion, most commonly by mapping glucose metabolism. In many instances, PET can dif- ferentiate between healthy and cancerous tis- sues. PET scans are often used in conjunction with CT scans and may be complementary to MRI. “Wouldn’t it be great if …” is one of Sha- ron Dargay’s favorite phrases. As Imaging Services Administrator for Crozer-Keystone, she frequently discusses requirements and hopes with physicians, administrators, and even patients. “I study their wish lists and make recommendations for new equipment. Our constant goal is to offer the latest and most convenient services to patients. My role is to apply behind-the-scenes strategy and problem-solving skills to achieve desired so- lutions. I love to hear patients say: ‘Yes, this is the service we want, and Brinton Lake Im- aging is where we want it performed.’” SUPERLATIVE DIAGNOSTIC PROGRAM FOR WOMEN Women’s imaging is exemplar to Dargay’s diligence. “It is a central part of our services at Brinton Lake,” notes Dr. Muetterties. “We are fortunate to have experts like Lisa Colla- zzo, MD, and her colleagues. They truly meet women’s health needs in Delaware and Ches- ter Counties.” (610) 558-5000 www.WhiteHorseVillage.org A nonprofit accredited lifecare community Embrace What Is Important Pets Welcome Nature’s Beauty Health & Wellness CULINARY DELIGHTS One-level living ARTS & CULTURE PEACE OF MI N D When you retire at White Horse Village you become part of a friendly, hometown neigborhood surrounded by natural beauty.