Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141 Page 142 Page 143 Page 144 Page 145 Page 146 Page 147 Page 148 CHESTERCOUNTY-LIFE.COM / November/December 2016 21 the patient would hold back her thoughts and opinions without expression, and in re- sponse, out of habit, would excessively hold her breath at the expense of her own body and health. In another case scenario, Dr. McCarel describes, “a woman had already seen a number of therapists and visited our website and was intrigued about our biofeedback and neurofeedback services. The patient was overweight and had a major issue with overeating as a way to soothe herself. We view behavior and emotional issues within a mind-body framework. In therapy, we con- nected with the idea that using food as a way to comfort is not a viable alternative. Through mindfulness and other techniques we discovered ways to soothe and comfort aside from overusing food. She has lost a good amount of weight and has made a job change and modifications in her family life. The food issue is often the jumping off point; learning how to take care of her own needs and feelings was the real challenge.” A third example involves an adolescent who a pediatrician referred to Dr. McCarel for biofeedback. “She was experiencing tre- mendous anxiety with symptoms of sleep- ing difficulty, constant worrying about tests, and issues with peer groups: struggling with friendships and maintaining friendships. She just could not relax. We conducted several biofeedback sessions, educated her on the two parts of the nervous system, and taught her relaxation methods.” Inferring that this 2813 West 17th Street, Wilmington, DE 19806 www.towerhill.org LEADERSHIP experience TOWER HILL SCHOOL experience OPPORTUNITY experience ilmington, DE 19806 www.towerhill.org Matthew Santos ‘17 on a service trip to the Philippines Register at 302-657-8350 or www.towerhill.org/openhouse OPEN HOUSES Sunday, Nov. 6, 1 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1, 9 a.m. Register at 302-657-8350 or www.towerhill.org/openhouse Licensed Clinical Psychologist Katie Bhogal, PsyD, BCB Licensed Clinical Psychologist Tara Wheeler, PsyD, BCN