Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141 Page 142 Page 143 Page 144 Page 145 Page 146 Page 147 Page 14848 Chester County Life / CHESTERCOUNTY-LIFE.COM F O O D & E N T E R TA I N M E N T Holiday dinners are divine, party celebra- tions, captivating, and family festivities, filled with fun. Guests look forward to such gatherings for months and talk about the occasions all winter. Guests, yes! But, what about the hosts and hostesses? Their experiences often resemble a skirmish spiced with ominous opening bells and threats of missed deadlines. Days before the big event, party-givers bake, chop, mince, and assemble. From dawn to doorbell’s first chime, they scur- ry about the kitchen cooking, cleaning up, cooking some more, tasting, prepping each course with care then tidying up yet again. Timing is of utmost importance. Hors d’oeuvres placed in perfect profusion before guests arrive. Tables set, candles lit, and décor artfully arranged. Roast in oven, vegetables crisping, bar set up. Oops, I for- got to thaw the cranberries! Where is the gluten-free cornbread for Aunt Eleanor? Is there enough mac and cheese for the extra unexpected kids? I don’t even have a min- ute to get dressed. CARLINO’S TO THE RESCUE Lesley Gore’s lyrics – It’s my party, and I’ll cry if I want to – come to mind. But, hey, why shed tears, hold your breath in hopes of the occasion proceeding as planned or remain isolated over pots, pans, and plat- ters while everyone else enjoys the fruits of your labor? Granted, holding a holiday gala is an exuberant experience. Wouldn’t it mean so much more to all if you were free to share it? Instead of grimacing at please join us cries from the dining room, think about mingling, catching up with friends, and savoring mouthwatering bliss. Carlino’s has it covered, completed – and – catered. “Our team of catering co- ordinators custom design menus for each event,” says Nick Carlino, Chief Market- ing Officer of the family-owned business. “We provide wait staff, bartenders, setup, and cleanup for small parties of 25 to cor- porate extravaganzas for 1,000 guests. Creating a sit-down dinner where the hosts actually do sit down is our specialty.” Holiday Happiness Means Never Having to Miss Your Own Party Carlino’s has it covered. “Our team of catering coordinators custom design menus for each event,” says Nick Carlino, Chief Marketing Officer of the family- owned business. “We provide wait staff, bartenders, setup, and cleanup for small parties of 25 to corporate extravaganzas for 1,000 guests. Creating a sit-down dinner where the hosts actually do sit down is our specialty.” BY SUSAN I. SHIBER