Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136 Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141 Page 142 Page 143 Page 144 Page 145 Page 146 Page 147 Page 148 CHESTERCOUNTY-LIFE.COM / November/December 2016 93 Kassimi had not only chanced upon a great place to dine, he was presented with an opportunity for a culinary pursuit. Earlier this year, he purchased Spence on High Street. “I see it as an opportu- nity for growth with great potential in the wonderful town of West Chester. Spence on High Street is a little treasure.” A CELEBRATED ORIGIN When West Chester was called Riggtown, its more prosperous resi- dents lived near High Street. They often dined at Spence Café on Gay Street, which was opened by a local family in 1849. Shellfish was a specialty. Oysters, fried clams, snapper soup, and a signature chowder spiked with piquant horseradish grown in the restaurant’s basement were the talk of the town. Spence Café once again captured discerning palates in the late 20th century. It was a popular spot to gather and enjoy a variety of succulent dishes prepared to singular satisfaction. Now, in its third glorious life as Spence on High Street, the BYOB restaurant is wel- coming old friends and attracting newcomers, thanks to Kassimi’s marketing shrewdness and Executive Chef John Banes’ talent in the kitchen. “Spence isn’t a spur-of-the-moment stop,” points out the owner. “It’s a destination for folks who appreciate ambience and exception- al cuisine. That’s why we tapped our previous database and invited people back, created a strong online identity, and called Chester County Life, a magazine avidly read by our audience. Former guests are very happy to re-visit, and first-timers take great pleasure in din- ing with us, then returning again and again.” The setting adds to the experience. Tiny twinkling lights entwine a wrought iron fence and entry doors, while attractive Roman blinds dramatize windows. The walls, painted in soft apricot, accentuate the warmth of the restaurant and present a pristine backdrop for paintings by West Chester artist James Lee Burk. The secrets to Executive Chef John Banes’ mouthwatering dishes are surprisingly simple. “Cooking is a feeling that flows through the heart and shines in the food,” he eloquently explains. “It’s not complicated. I don’t over-do. I use the best and freshest ingredients and let them speak for themselves.”